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  1. #1
    John Nagle
    Guest

    Default The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting

    The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting..."and other machines" - Robert D. Porter CMW Porter Books 2006


    I wasn't very impressed with his previous book "The Pin Pallet Escapement" but this book is a different story.
    Filled with descriptive diagrams and photos, this book is a good start for someone interested in the topic!
    Some of the topics:
    How to:
    * Design several types of gears and the cutters to make them
    * Make an indexing attachment for your lathe
    * Cutter forming tool radius grinding attachment for your lathe
    * Sine bar angle attachment for your lathe to make gear cutters
    * Gear cutter centering device
    * Support attachment for your lathe
    * Center distance tool
    Even plans and instruction to build a simple weight driven clock.
    Those plans usually cost the price of this book.


    John Nagle http://www.geocities.com/mrb2132000/mypage
    *

  2. #2

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    John, is this book in the NAWCC lending library? I just went to the online card catolog and they only show his other book. The reason I ask is because I have a hard time using the online system. There have been times when have tried many combinations and "sorry, no record found " but then I freind tells me he got the book from lending library. Thanks, John

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    John, they have three lending copies, but they're all out right now. (And here we are complaining that no one wants to read books anymore..... )
    There is also a non-lending copy in the "Special" collection, probably a manuscript copy. In Winnebago, I just entered "Porter" and clicked "author". Sometimes it's best not to be too specific; Robert could be listed as Robt., Bob, Rob, Bobby, R., etc.
    I read this book last month, and I'm going to propose that the NAWCC giftshop carry it. Currently, it's only available from the AWI. Refreshingly, it's not too expensive. It's a real book, as opposed to his previous work, which was almost short enough to be called a pamphlet. It's 8.5" X 11", in paperback.
    The best thing about this book is that it gives specific data about how to make "cycloidal" gear cutters. Now that the dollar is in the gutter, Thornton cutters are over $100 each, making this information well worth the book's purchase.
    [edit=898=1173762492][/edit]

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    John writes: The reason I ask is because I have a hard time using the online system. There have been times when have tried many combinations and "sorry, no record found " but then I freind tells me he got the book from lending library.

    The Winnebago conline catalog of the Library in Columbia have its quirks, both sytem wise and content wise, but with some practice you can find lots of stuff there.

    As Bill said it is often better to search for less, like Author last name only, and remember to lookfat the bottom if there is a second page of search results (it lookks like the screen is not full even if there are many screens of results). If you are looking by keywords use variations (tall case, tallcase, long case, longcase etc). Use only a few words from the title if the title is long etc.
    Fortunat Mueller-Maerki, -Chair NAWCC Library Com./ Editor & Publisher of BHM
    Mem.NAWCC Mus.Coll.Com. / VP, USA Sect. Antiq.Horolog.Soc.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    I purchased this book a couple of months ago with the intention of enhancing my knowledge of wheel cutting although at the present time I do not cut my own wheels.Although the book seems to be well written I had a hard time following it probably because my background is in metal fabrication and not the machine shop trade.I think this book would probably be an asset to someone who works in the tool and die or general machine shop industry but I personally believe the average layman is going to have a tough time grasping all the concepts of wheel and gear cutting as described in this publication.My own personal opinion..
    I will say that I have been communicating with one of our more experienced horological machinists (Jerry Keiffer) pertaining to wheel cutting and he was kind enough to send me a copy of some of some of the lesson plans that he uses to teach mini lathe and milling machine skills with and I found them much easier to grasp,especially the wheel cutting sections.I'm sure after years of instructing Mr.Keiffer has been able to fine tune his lesson plan so that the average schmoe like me can better understand the concept of tabletop machining.
    This is certainly not meant as a slight toward Mr. Porter's book.I certainly respect the effort he put in to writing it. I would just say check it out first and then decide if it fits your educational needs.
    Respectfully,Bob Fullerton

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    I, too, expected a little more detail from this book in the way of explanation. I think it will be a great reference for gear set and cutter specifications. I am not finished reading it, but that is my impression so far.
    -------Tony-------
    Arizona Clock Repair

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    I found it to be a good book but do have a question. Porter's method for making pinion cutters does not provide for rake on the cutting edge of the individual cutter "leaves". Instead he seems to rely on having thel "land" on top of the tooth very small.

    Of course commercial cutters provide relief in this area.

    Any opinions?
    David Robertson - Kingsland, TX

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Clock & Watchmaker's Guide To Gear Cutting (RE: John Nagle)

    Fortunat, thank you for the tips on how to use the online card catalog. I have become extremely frustrated at times. Especially when I have previously pulled up the book. I will try the "less is better" technique. I have to tell you I love the library. I think it is a real bargain and incredible source/wealth of information. Keep up the good work. John #0159010

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