Month's Goal: $300, Received: $120.00 - (40%) Contribute Now
Donate whatever you can or Join the 15,000 other NAWCC members for only $72 (plus $10 for hard copy publications). Check it out here.


NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 4045 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch

    Hi,

    Just wondering what is the best way to buff out some of the normal scratches due to everyday use on a stainless steel watch?

    Does anyone know where I can get Franck Muller watch parts at a discounted price?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Hi,

    Just wondering what is the best way to buff out some of the normal scratches due to everyday use on a stainless steel watch?

    Does anyone know where I can get Franck Muller watch parts at a discounted price?

    Thanks

  3. #3
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Hi,

    And welcome to the NAWCC Message Board. If you love watches, you've come to the right place.

    Properly polishing a steel watch case would require that the watch come out of the case, the case being prepped by a thorough cleaning, a buffing motor, the right buffing wheels, and the right polishing agents for the job.

    You asked about the types of polishing agents to be used on stainless steel. I use tripoli on a regular muslin buff to get rid of pronounced scratches, followed by a thorough wash of the case to eliminate traces of the tripoli. You don't want it contaminating your next buff. The tripoli buff must be used only for tripoli after this. The next buff is either a soft muslin, or cotton flannel buff which is much softer. With this you can use either red rouge or white Fabulustre to give you a final polish. This buff must be used only for final polishing after this.

    If you have in mind just a simple hand polishing of the case, you may be able to make some improvement in the finish, but it is unlikely that you will get out deeper scratches. Maybe somebody can recommend a metal polish for this. Flitz maybe?

    Doug S.

  4. #4
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Thanks Doug for the warm welcome and advice.

    I don't think I have enough expertise to do it myself, can anyone recommend a reputable person in Southern Cal?

    One last question, how often do you need to "service" an automatic watch that's worn on a daily basis?

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    The short answer is, about 2 to 5 years.

    The answer to your question about servicing a watch is about like the answer to how often to change the oil and air filter in your car. It depends on the condition of the watch, (i. e. age), type of watch (i. e. dress or heavy duty), is it quartz or mechanical, conditions in which it is worn (what some wearers consider normal wear, is considered abuse by watchmakers), how long you hope to preserve the watch, the original purchase price of the watch (i. e. is it a toss-away), what your expectations are of the watch in terms of performance, etc. I don't think there is one answer only to your question. Part of the complete cleaning job is other routine maintenance such as replacing gaskets, crowns when necessary, crystals when necessary, in other words, maintenance aimed at preventing problems.

    From a personal point of view, I have over 100 watches. Most of them get used only for exhibit. Right or wrong, they only get seriviced when they no longer run. So many watches, so little time! The ones that get worn regularly, on average every five years or so. But I'm easy on watches, and I service them myself.

    Doug S.

  6. #6
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Thanks again Doug for your inputs.

    the watch in question is a Franck Muller conquistador chronograph, its fairly expensive and I wear it everyday. I do not swim, shower, or play sports in it. But I have been noticing that it goes about 10 minutes fast. I've had it for about 3 years now and the only thing I've done is go through about 3 sets of watch bands. I'm very gentle on the watch. I've been reluctant to send it back to Franck Muller for service because it will take at least a month's time.
    Any suggestions?

  7. #7
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    Is the Franck Muller the one you need to buff? You've gone through 3 watch (straps or bands) in 3 years? You're easy on the watch? Hmmmmm! I would suggest that you do NOT want a "cheap" repair on the watch! There is no such thing as a cheap repair on a chronograph. I am not familiar with the Conquistador, but if it has an automatic wind with calendar as well, be prepared for a shock. "Cheap repair" equates with "Half a repair". I think your watch is worth better care than that.

    Ten minutes fast? In how long? A day? You might have a problem. A week? A month? Have you checked with a Muller dealer about simply regulating it? That might be worth some consideration.

    Regards,
    Doug S.

  8. #8
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Hey Doug,

    Yes this is the watch I want buffed, the watch came with a rubber strap that's not very strong, wear it and take it off everyday so there's some wear on the band. As far as the ten minutes fast thing, it takes about two weeks to get ten minutes fast but after that it stablizes. I've taken it to a local Muller dealer, he told me that its only off about +-3 sec a day.

    I think I'm just going to have to bite the bullet and send it out for maintenance. I'm also a collector but only about 20 or so watches.

    Thanks again

    [This message was edited by Watchjunkie on June 26, 2003 at 17:30.]

  9. #9
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    Try this. Make a log with a column for DATE, a column for RE-SET, a column for TIME, and a VARIANCE column for + or -. Choose an accurate time source, and STAY WITH THAT time source, and that source only. Re-set your watch so that it is dead on with that time source. Mark the DATE you did it in the DATE column, put a TICK mark that you re-set it in the RE-SET column, mark the time (24-hour time) in the time column, and mark the + - VARIANCE column with a 'zero".

    For the first couple of days, do it daily at about the same time. Each day you do it, mark the DATE in the date column, the TIME you checked in the time column, and + or - amount in VARIANCE column. Don't tick the RE-SET column unless you re-set it!

    Then maybe try it twice a week. At + or - 3 seconds daily, it should take about 6 months for the time to vary by 10 minutes. Your chart will tell you EXACTLY what the rate variance is, and also the time frame. If it runs within + or - 3 seconds daily, that nearly qualifies as quartz time.

    The point of this exercise is that it will tell you what to do, and how badly it needs to be done!

    Regards,
    Doug S.

  10. #10
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    I will try that and let you know, but this watch doesn't have a seconds hand, so I guess I can only track it by minutes.

    Thanks again

  11. #11
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    A chronograph without a seconds hand? I'm certain you said it was a chronograph, did you not? A chronograph usually has 2 seconds hands!

    Doug S.

  12. #12
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Hey Doug,

    Yes its a chronograph with out a normal seconds hand. There's a only a seconds hand when the chrono is activiate, and its fly back.

    It is kind of weird now that you mention it, all my other chronos does have the second seconds hand..

  13. #13
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    I suggest you set the minute hand right on the next full minute, the seconds hand right on the 60 second mark, then start the watch when your reference time source indicates to start the watch. Leave the seconds hand running, and do the log as I suggested.

    Doug

  14. #14
    Watchjunkie
    Guest

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Hey Doug,

    I'd finally remembered to start the chrono and I've left it running for about 5 1/2 hours now. The seconds hand is about 7 seconds faster then the digital clock that I syncro'd with. So I think its time to take it in and get it recaliberated.?. Your thoughts?

    thanks

  15. #15
    Registered User doug sinclair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    11,360
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Buffing out scratches on a stainless steel watch (RE: Watchjunkie)

    Watchjunkie,

    That would amount to about 10 minutes in 2 1/2 weeks, or thereabouts. If your watch was purchased new three years ago, then it should be possible to bring it to a better rate with just a regulation, I suspect. A full technical revision on it will be expensive!

    Regards,
    Doug S.

Similar Threads

  1. Polishing stainless steel watch cases
    By FredWJensen in forum Watch Repair
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-01-2009, 01:11 PM
  2. Restoring brushed finish on stainless steel case
    By Tuttebenne in forum Watch Repair
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-30-2007, 05:28 PM
  3. Please help me find out information on a watch
    By Shawn Reader in forum American Pocket Watches
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-25-2006, 03:40 PM
  4. Black on stainless steel removal
    By jep in forum Watch Repair
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-15-2005, 06:45 PM
  5. Scratches on plastic watch glass
    By p11 ranger in forum Wrist Watches
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-16-2003, 10:27 AM

Members who have read this thread: 4

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •